Relationship Between Sugar and Slavery

Dublin Core

Title

Relationship Between Sugar and Slavery

Subject

Abolitionism

Description

A Vindication of the Use of Sugar is a relatively short, 22-page long pamphlet. 1792, the time of the work’s publication, has been an era with increasing slavery in the British colonies, as well as emerging arguments for abolition. It is baffling that such heavy topic of slavery is simply viewed and tied to economy, but the pamphlet serves as an accurate reflection of the British views of sugar and slavery of the time. Throughout the work, justifications of the need for Black slavery are underscored. There is a direct message from the anonymous author that sugar is not the cause of slavery. However, slavery exists because of the “opposite climate” that helpless Europeans come from. Cash crops dominating colonies’ economy require labor that Europeans are incapable of, and sugar is one of the many other cash crops available for growth, making African slave trade inevitable. The message embeds a prejudice that Black population will be fit for such labor and untouched environment. But regardless of how immoral this idea may be considered today, it is important to note that this is an argument one had at the time regarding slavery. The fact that this work was published as a pamphlet makes viewing the original copy invaluable, as it shows the mundaneness and popularity of the work in the 18th century, and therefore the issues of agricultural economy and slavery.

Creator

Anonymous

Source

A Vindication of the Use of Sugar, the Produce of the West-India Islands. In Answer to a Pamphlet Entitled Remarkable Extracts

Publisher

London, printed for T. Boosey

Date

1792

Contributor

Chaerin Son

Rights

USC Archives & Special Collections: Call # HD9111.5 .V3 1792

Relation

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Format

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Language

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Type

[no text]

Identifier

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Coverage

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Files

120.jpg

Citation

Anonymous, “Relationship Between Sugar and Slavery,” Black Britons in USC Archives & Special Collections, accessed July 21, 2017, http://uscblackbritons.omeka.net/items/show/33.